In the News: Four tricks to build trust between managers and employees - Abel HR

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In the News: Four tricks to build trust between managers and employees

If you want your employees to stick around, your first port of call should be checking in with your managers. The reason? Employees are far more likely to leave a job if they have a bad manager or boss than those who like their higher ups.
Survey after survey suggests that a bad boss is one that doesn’t trust their employees. With this in mind, Carolyn O’Hara, in a recent post on the Harvard Business Review blog, outlines four tricks that managers can use to foster trust with their employees.

Keep it clear:
Sure, there are certain company secrets that a manager can’t disclose, but managers should strive to be as transparent as possible with all other non-sensitive information. Company goals, performance metrics and overall performance should all be discussed openly and honestly between manager and worker, with extra credit awarded to those that offer up information before an employee can even ask. O’Hara notes that being transparent not only increases trust, but also works wonders to keep the office rumor mill under control.

Be the boss, but don’t be bossy:
By definition, a manager is someone who is in charge, but a trustworthy boss doesn’t feel the need to boss people around. The best managers function as a coach by making their expectations clear, providing a framework to work within, and then lending support to get the job done.

Admit to your mess-ups:
When you’ve made a mistake, sometimes the hardest part is confessing. However, a good manager can leverage a mess-up to help build credibility with their team, as well as potentially serve as a teaching opportunity for others. Further, if it is someone on the team who has made a mistake, a good and trustworthy manager should consider sharing a time when they faltered – or even failed – in order to build empathy and further forge trust with workers.

Manage your motormouth:
Sharing a story of your own slip up can build empathy, but sharing stories of other’s foibles can destroy trust. In the eyes of your employee, if you’re willing to badmouth Jill in accounting, what’s to say you won’t turn around and talk bad about them. Be sure that if you are sharing a story, it is one that doesn’t implicate others!

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