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Check out our weekly blog posts and see the latest news and discussions happening in the HR world of business.

Survey: Low-tech channels best for communicating employee benefits info

Results of Prudential’s Eighth Annual Study of Employee Benefits: Today and Beyond reveals that face-to-face meetings continue to be the most successful means to communicate benefits information to employees, despite an increased interest in digital communication methods.
In the survey, 74% of the firms in the study reported having “great” or “moderate” success with seminars and group meetings, while 72% reported similar outcomes with one-on-one meetings, 68% voiced success with email and 61% with toll-free phone numbers.
Despite this perceived success, workers reported that their preferences for benefits communication were work email, which was favored by 47%, followed by personal email at 28%, group meetings at 19%, and an online avatar designed to recommend benefits that meet your needs at 19%. Further, one-on-one meetings were only preferred by 18 % of workers.
The Prudential survey also revealed that firms are increasingly focused on providing year-round education to workers. To carry out this plan, 84% of firms indicated that email was the best method to provide effective year-round communication of benefits, followed by home mailings at 77%, signing-up on benefit websites at 76%, phone calls at 75% and text messages at 46%.

The report also examined ways in which employers expected to be able receive benefits-related info in future and found that five years from now, 60% of firms expect to be able to use mobile devices for financial planning tools, 59% to obtain information about insurance plans, 59% to manage retirement savings accounts, 56% to submit a claim, 55% to enroll in benefits and 47% to submit evidence of insurability.
How do you communicate benefits information to your employees? How do you expect that to change over the coming years?

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