W2 Issues/Concerns

  • This field is for validation purposes and should be left unchanged.

Blog

Check out our weekly blog posts and see the latest news and discussions happening in the HR world of business.

Tips for Adjusting to a New Job

Starting a new job is both exciting and stressful. You’re looking forward to a new opportunity but also navigating an unfamiliar environment with unfamiliar faces. Not only do you have to learn the ropes when it comes to your roles and responsibilities but also fit in with your new coworkers.

As you settle into your new job, here are a few tips to keep in mind:

Don’t Feel Overwhelmed

The first few weeks of a new job can feel like information overload. You’ll be touring the office, meeting new people, learning about employee benefits and discovering how to do your job. Don’t get overwhelmed by all of this information. You’re not expected to retain it all. Rather, it’s an opportunity to get familiar with the most important aspects of your job.

Take Time to Adjust

If you’re coming from a job where you loved your work culture, you may want to recreate this at your new job. But, adjustments take time. You can’t compare your old job to your new one, as it’s a completely different place with unique people. On average, it takes three to six months to fully adjust, possibly longer in some cases.

Reach Out to Others

Make an effort to get to know others in the office. Even if you are an introvert, it’s important to push yourself to be friendly and outgoing. If you’re not one to tag along for lunch or sit with others in the break room, ask questions. Asking for help facilitates interaction and also shows your eagerness to learn.

Understand Your Goals

Transparency is crucial at any job, but it’s particularly important when starting a new role. Talk with your boss to understand your goals for the first few months. Being on the same page will provide clarity and direction. You may learn that your boss only expects you to know a fraction of what you thought, cutting down on internal stress. At the same time, your boss may expect you to know more than you realized, forcing you to adjust your expectations.

Adapt to the Company Culture

Pay attention to the culture of the workplace. Fitting in will make your job more enjoyable. Some workplaces are strict. Everyone is on time to meetings and there is little socialization during the day. Others are more laidback. Meetings are informal and the office is never quiet. You don’t need to change who you are, but you’ll enjoy your job more when you adapt to the culture.

Ask for Feedback

It may feel strange to ask your supervisor how you’re doing, but this shows that you care about your progress and are open to hearing what you could be doing better. If there’s something you need to work on, you can start doing it now. And, if you’re doing great, it will be nice to hear this from your boss.

Most people change jobs at one point or another, which means we can all relate to being the new person on the block. Keep the above tips in mind as you start your new journey. It won’t be long until you feel like an integral part of the company.

#AbelCanHelp – call 609.860.0400 or visit us at abelhr.com to find out more!

Featured BLOGS

  • HR How-To: Avoid Diversity Recruiting Mistakes

    When it comes to recruiting, we all know the rules on discriminating against gender, race, cultural background, etc. But are there other, perhaps less obvious, ways in which you can discriminate against candidates? And could these micro-discriminations be causing you to create a homogenous corporate culture where everyone looks – and perhaps most dangerously, thinks alike?Below, we outline four of these micro-discriminations that most frequently occur when looking to fill entry-level spots and what you can do to avoid them: School Daze:Certain schools carry with them a certain cache. If you’re picking candidates from the Ivy Leagues, you expect your

  • HR How-To: Successfully Manage PTSD In The Workplace

    In recent years, companies have been offered increasingly attractive incentives to hire veterans. Realistically, veterans make excellent hires being that they are disciplined, trainable, and generally have a can-do attitude. But one of the common concerns that come up for companies considering hiring a vet centers around post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and what employers need to do to best support these employees in the workplace.  So, before we dive in, let’s discuss the basics: What is PTSD? Essentially, PTSD is an anxiety disorder which can develop in individuals that have experienced a life-threatening event, such as combat for soldiers, or

Archives